Val Cox Neptune

Lampwork Colour Guide -> Frit Blends -> Val Cox Neptune

Neptune

Neptune has a chameleon-like quality for being able to shift between warm or cool tones depending on the base you pair it with.

Painting by Andre van Loo.

Buy this frit blend at ValCoxFrit.com

Amy’s notes:

I really fell in love with this blend. Again, like so many of the Painter’s Series blends, I just found it extremely versatile. I feel like there are still many ways I want to try using it, and I’ve had some gorgeous results already.

I did have some cracking issues when I encased this blend in Lauscha.  I recommend that you test first before making a whole pile of encased beads. I didn’t test with any of the other 104 clears (it encased beautifully in Reichenbach R100 clear, a 96 COE clear). I did make frit swirl style beads with Moretti 004 Clear, and had no cracking issues there, but the frit swirl beads seem to be immune to some of the cracking issues that go along with encasing generally. I think maybe it’s because the glasses are mixed together more, rather than layered on top of each other.

Neptune encased in Lauscha clear
Neptune encased in Lauscha Clear with Silver

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Val Cox Neptune frit encased in Kugler K100 clear.

Neptune K100
Val Cox Neptune frit swirled and speckled in Kugler K100 clear.

Neptune 004
Val Cox Neptune frit swirled in Moretti 004 Clear.

Neptune 034
Moretti 034 Transparent Light Aquamarine and Val Cox Neptune frit.

Neptune 031
Val Cox Neptune frit on Moretti 031 Transparent Pale Emerald Green.

Neptune 204
Val Cox Neptune frit on Moretti 204 Pastel White.

Neptune 232
Val Cox Neptune frit on Moretti 232 Pastel Light Turquoise.

And some lentil sets

Neptune 036 219
Val Cox Neptune frit on base of Moretti 036 Transparent Dark Aquamarine and Moretti 219 Pastel Copper Green.

Neptune 090 266
Val Cox Neptune frit on a base of Moretti 090 Seaweed and Moretti 266 Opal Yellow

And finally, here are my paddle tests of this blend. It doesn’t demonstrate the 104 palette in full by any means, but gives a pretty good idea of how the blend reacts with a variety of colours.